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Chance The Rapper & Jimmy Butler cover ESPN Entertainment issue

UPDATE: Here is the full cover story, interview, and two powerful and entertaining video clips.

This whole read — here — is pretty important. They each touch on social issues facing the city they are the two biggest faces of. (I would name a Cub too but it’s hard to pick just one, right?) Anyway, I picked out a couple snippets and the first video expounds even more on the Q&A below.

Give The Undefeated a look with the article and a bunch more photos from their creative, coloring book photo shoot showin’ love to the hometown in the process. Respect!

TINSLEY: Whether you like it or not, you two are the new faces of Chicago. What’s that responsibility like?
BUTLER: It’s cool because every morning, you just have to continue to be who you are, do what you did to get you to this point. That’s the way I look at it. And in this city, that’s all anybody ever asks of you is to work hard. When you bring that, they love you.
CHANCE: I don’t know how Jimmy does it ’cause he’s not from here, but that’s a lot of weight, right? Just carrying, like, the reality of it, the aggression and, like you said, the hardworking attitude. But also being a person of influence in a city that’s so small, it’s so communal, everybody knows each other here. I was raised here, and it’s been kind of a fishbowl thing—I’ve swam around a bunch of times. But I feel very comfortable, and it’s good to still live here.

TINSLEY: I don’t know if you saw the tweet from President Trump where he said he was going to send the feds into Chicago, citing violence. What does that say about this country, that we still view Chicago under that violence lens?
CHANCE: I hope he’s coming in to do some type of federal overturn of our state and city budgets in terms of schooling and housing. I’m tired of n—–s talkin’ about Chicago like it’s a Third World country. Like, that it’s not a place of booming business with a very successful downtown and all types of new development. It sounds like he was announcin’ he was going to war with Chicago. I don’t like to look at s— through that lens.
BUTLER: I just think it’s hard to relate to the people here if you can’t relate to them. If you keep throwin’ ’em in a category that they’re violent, no matter if they change or not, they’re still going to be in that category.
You go down there and you change people’s lives. You make them want to do better for the next person. And that’s when Chicago is going to be a beautiful place, and nobody’s comin’ here talkin’ about how bad it is like he said, like a Third World country. ’Cause that’s not it.