Krewella’s Jahan Yousaf on cyber-bullying

Jahan has broken her silence on the Rain Man lawsuit and in the process made an important statement on modern-day societial issues, especially when it comes to cyber-bullying and sexism.

I thought it was especially powerful given the intense criticism her and her sister Yasmine received after Rain Man’s lawsuit went public. Here’s a couple snippets of the op-ed piece Jahan wrote for Billboard, titled ‘Deadmau5 Saved Me From Going Into Porn’.

This isn’t just about deadmau5 or porn. It’s about sex, media and humanity. After 10 months of being removed from social media, this highly publicized lawsuit has lured me out of my cave. “Highly publicized,” meaning it was embarrassingly the No. 1 trending topic on Facebook, disseminated by TMZ, and received coverage by almost every single dance music blog. I did not participate or respond to the Krewella breakup chatter. I just stalked the fuck out of myself, read comments, and played the voyeur like Peeping Tom. Can someone please create an algorithm for how many times the words “whore” and “krewella” are used in the same sentence online?? These are just a few of the hundreds I collected:

Some of you are probably laughing at these comments, as I did at first. But hell, I can’t even fake a smile right now. This sickens me, because the way we participate in Internet dialogue mirrors our attitude as a society. And what I see in that reflection is an immense amount of hatred and intolerance for one another. It’s time to smash the fuckin’ mirror. I have been silent for too long. I am relapsing after avoiding social media to share what I have learned and to encourage people to challenge and question what they read/hear/see from now on, and that goes for situations beyond our case, whether it’s politics or celebrity gossip. The sad part is that it is 2014, and people are still passively reading headlines for face value, parroting the words of celebrities, and jumping on the bandwagon of popular opinion. I don’t see enough people challenging the intolerance that deadmau5 preaches to his 3 million followers, researching beyond the headlines they read, or protesting against the derogatory dialogue that circulates on social networks.

Jahan also addresses her one-time relationship with Rain Man and overall, shares how her personal experiences and examples can serve for improvement and inspiration to the young generations in this digital information age. The entire piece is a well-written, important read here.

ICYMI: Krewella “Say Goodbye”