FKA twigs “Glass & Patron”

Whoa!

I find myself saying that after every FKA twigs video but this one for a reason I didn’t expect. You’ll see for yourself in the beginning. The highlight for me comes in the latter third of the video with FKA draped in a seductive red getup with a set of similarly outrageously attired backup dancers. The movements here are artistic and hypnotic and more closely resemble the edgy lyrics of “Glass & Patron”. It wasn’t one of my favorite tracks from LP1 but after the visual I’m inspired to run it back with renewed energy.

Whatever you may think of FKA twigs’ visuals (this one another that’s self-directed), there’s no doubt they’re something fresh and I always appreciate artists for pushing the envelope there. She’s really doin’ that on another level too.

FKA twigs teaches dance class pre-stardom

Artists pre-stardom is almost certainly fascinating and for FKA twigs, it’s no different. I actually haven’t dived into one of my favorite new singer’s come-up too much so this was a cool surprise to say the least. But by knowing her performances, it really isn’t a surprise… just really cool.

A 22-year old FKA twigs teaches a dance class in London and this is the grainy, interview/tutorial. Watch and enjoy!

h/t Factmag

FKA Twigs “Pendulum”

FKA Twigs continues her series of evocative music videos off her critically acclaimed, LP1, with a new one for “Pendulum” today. She directs once again and uses the cameras beautifully to zoom out towards the image above. It’s an odd video, yes, but also striking given the lyrics of the song. Interpret it as you may above.

*Tibs Fav. (one of my personal favorites from the album)

FKA Twigs reveals Google Glass story

Remember the cool Google Glass ad starring FKA Twigs?!

Well, FKA Twigs revealed how that came about in a new interview and there are a few lessons and takeaways that you may be able to parallel with in your own life.

Namely: persistence (Google) and the limitless boundaries for creativity with FKA Twigs making sure she had full control of the ad. Very cool.

“Google approached me, and they asked me to make this advert for Google Glass. My first reaction was ‘no.’ I was like, ‘Why would I do that? That’s ridiculous.’ And then they asked again, but then I still said, ‘No, stop hitting me up, stop hitting up my people, this is awkward.’ And then they asked again, and I was like okay, maybe I’m setting barriers for myself, because I’m sitting here, living in East London, signed to a cool label, Young Turks, with all my cool friends wearing cool clothes, and maybe I just need to branch out of that and work with a corporation—a company that’s essentially one of the biggest organizations in the world.

Why would I be like, ‘No, I’m not doing that, I’m not associating myself with that,’ when it’s actually an amazing opportunity. So I agreed to go and meet them in L.A., and I went to the sort of ‘Glass haven,’ and they showed me these glasses and how they worked. I just had an idea straight away. That’s how I am with my videos. When I make something, it’s because I’ve had that idea within 10 minutes of creating it, and I just roll with it. I saw the whole advert in my head, even when they were just talking to me about how to press play on the Glass.

I was like, ‘Okay, I guess that’s a good sign. So then they asked if I wanted to do it, and I said, ‘Yes, I do, but you have to let me do whatever I want. Don’t change anything. It’s my idea, I’m going to be very clear about everything. I’ll do a storyboard; I’ll make it perfectly clear to you what I want to do, but once it’s done, you don’t touch it.’ And they were down, and I think that working with an artist like myself, they knew that would be the deal. So I made it, and I guess it was as simple as that.

Even in the video, it was me putting a full stop on a chapter of my life. It was me putting a full stop on a style. It was me; I had all the little mini-mes whohad been wearing all of the things that I’d worn over the past two years at photo shoots, like the Jean Paul Gaultier jumpsuit or the jewelry, the chokers. They were all things that I pulled in that I’d worn before, like in the Dazed shoot for example. It was me acknowledging to myself how far I’d come and putting a full stop on that, and saying, ‘Okay, it’s time for me to move on, because I want to be bigger than a style or a certain way of being.’

It was also me playing on the way I know people see me. Sometimes, I’ll be walking down the street, and people will be like, ‘I didn’t realize you were real! I thought you were just this thing on the computer. I can’t imagine how you make it in real life.’ So even me, without speaking, just making all these goofy words *does alien-like clicking voice from the commercial*—I know that’s how people want me to be. It’s not true, I’m not like that, I’m just a human, but I could just tell that that’s how people want me to be. I read before that when I speak in my gigs, people say it’s disappointing, because I’m a human. Well, yeah, I’m a human. I’m just a girl, a woman I guess now, but I wanted to be able to play on that and then put a full stop on that through working with an amazing company.

They were great to work with. They let me do whatever I wanted to do, and I think that it was a great collaboration, because we met each other half-way, and that’s what a collaboration should be. It has to be half of one person, and half of another person, and that’s exactly what it was.”

BONUS: A full, 4-song live performance (‘Lights On’, ‘Kicks’, ‘Hide’ and ‘Two Weeks’) on Seattle radio below:

h/t Complex & Oyster